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  • Smoking
  • Smoking

    Smoking

    What you need to know

    Smoking is known to be harmful, however some young people continue to choose to smoke. It is thought that 40% of regular smokers start smoking before they are 16 years old. Some teenagers and young people choose to smoke due to peer pressure, stress or habitual/learnt behaviour. Smoking is particularly dangerous amongst young people, due to their lungs not being fully developed. This means that smoking can have significant negative impacts on a young person. For example, a young person who smokes is much more likely to become breathless than those who don't. The media can portray smoking to appear glamorous or appealing, however it is important to know that there are serious negative impacts on health, as a result of smoking.

    Top Tips to Quit

    1) Make a decision that you are ready to quit smoking- this needs to be your choice, not your friend's or family's.
    2) Make a plan to quit, set a date and stick to it.
    3) Think of a contingency plan should you feel the need for a cigarette e.g. chewing gum.
    4) Consider adjusting your diet .
    5) Consider what social situations you place yourself in, e.g. the pub.
    6) Get some support from your friends.
    7) Give yourself some motivation/rewards to work towards.
    8) Remind yourself why you're quitting, make a list of reasons.
    9) Find other ways to relax/ de-stress.
    10) Get some Stop Smoking support from your school nurse/ online/ GP

    Further info

    There are loads of benefits to stopping smoking, these include: improved respiratory function, more energy, improved fertility, improved skin/ teeth and breath, a longer life expectancy, and saving the financial cost of buying cigarettes.

    Your school nurse will be more than happy to support you as you aim to quit smoking.

    For further information please see NHS Choices.